American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Newsroom

Latest News Releases

  • Patient Advocates Disappointed with Court Decision on Premium Tax Credits in Federal Marketplaces

    July 22, 2014 Categories: Advocacy News

    WASHINGTON – July 22, 2014 – The nation’s leading groups representing patients with and survivors of cancer, diabetes, heart disease and stroke issued the following statement today in response to the decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in the case of Halbig v. Burwell.

  • Eating probiotics regularly may improve your blood pressure

    July 21, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Probiotics – a bacteria in yogurt and supplements – appear to modestly lower blood pressure, according to a review of nine studies. The blood pressure-lowering effect from probiotics was greatest among people with elevated blood pressure. Additional studies are needed before doctors can confidently recommend probiotics for high blood pressure control and prevention.

  • Sexual abuse in childhood linked to signs of atherosclerosis in midlife

    July 17, 2014 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Study Highlights: Women sexually abused in childhood may show signs of atherosclerosis, an early marker of cardiovascular disease in midlife. Psychosocial factors are important to the development of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Awareness of the long-term mental and physical consequences of sexual abuse in childhood needs to be heightened nationally.

  • Home blood pressure-monitoring kits save insurance companies money

    July 14, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Insurance companies can save money by paying for home blood pressure-monitoring kits, which can improve healthcare quality and reduce healthcare costs. Home monitoring kits can be very effective in diagnosing high blood pressure and should become a mainstay of diagnosis and treatment in the United States.

  • Hispanic Americans need culturally tailored heart care

    July 14, 2014 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Statement Highlights: Healthcare providers need to consider culture and ethnicity as they counsel Hispanic patients on health behavior and health outcomes. Because Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing ethnic population in the United States, new research and clinical efforts should be directed towards understanding their range of diverse racial and cultural profiles. Addressing the cardiovascular health of U.S. minority populations, such as Hispanics, will help improve the cardiovascular health of the country as a whole.