$3 billion increase for NIH research, a triumph for the nation’s heart health, says American Heart Association

March 21, 2018 Categories: Advocacy News

WASHINGTON, D.C., Mar. 21, 2018 — American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following statement today on 2018 omnibus spending bill that would fund the federal government through September: 

“Good things come to those who wait, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been waiting a very long time for the sizable budget increase included in this legislation. 

The $3 billion recommended will be the most substantial federal support the NIH has received since the agency’s budget was doubled nearly two decades ago. This outstanding accomplishment deserves high praise and we commend the lawmakers whose bipartisanship made it possible.

If approved, we strongly encourage the NIH to invest more funding into heart and stroke research. Cardiovascular disease, the nation’s no. 1 and most costly killer, if left unchecked, will affect 45 percent of Americans by 2035. Research is our best hope to wipe out the burden cardiovascular disease will place on our nation’s health and economy in the coming years. 

Access to affordable health care is also critical in the fight against heart disease and stroke. Without health insurance, that care is out of reach for millions of Americans with cardiovascular disease and other pre-existing conditions. Consequently, we were disappointed to see that Congress did not include a proposal in the spending bill to stabilize the health insurance marketplace. This failure needs to be addressed promptly to protect patients and keep costs down.  

While we are extremely pleased that Congress has reached a consensus on NIH funding, we hope they can do the same when it comes to a stabilization bill. Americans can’t afford to wait any longer for the quality health care they deserve.

The association will take a more comprehensive look at how the omnibus bill affects Americans with heart disease and stroke as it makes its way through the legislative process.”

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About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the Association's science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical companies and device manufacturers, is available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For Media Inquiries:

Retha Sherrod: retha.sherrod@heart.org, 202-785-7929

For Public Inquiries: (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org