Monday Scientific Sessions News Tips

November 14, 2016 Categories: Heart News, Scientific Conferences & Meetings

Tip Headlines:

  • Mother’s blood sugar measurement associated with baby’s congenital heart disease risk
  • iPhone camera application may detect atrial fibrillation
  • Dramatic drops in blood pressure may be associated with a higher risk of death
  • Offspring may have higher risk for developing hypertension if their parents had hypertension before age 55

NOTE: ALL TIMES ARE CENTRAL. ALL TIPS ARE EMBARGOED UNTIL THE TIME OF PRESENTATION OR 3 p.m. CT/ 4 p.m. ET EACH DAY, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST.

Embargo: 12 p.m. CT/1 p.m. ET

Presentation: 661 – Session: LI.RFO.39 (News tip contains information not in the abstract.)

Mother’s blood sugar measurement associated with baby’s congenital heart disease risk

For the first time, researchers have shown that the level of blood sugar measured in the first trimester of pregnancy may be associated with the risk of delivering a baby with congenital heart disease, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Researchers looked at blood sugar levels measured during the first trimester in a study of 19,107 pregnant women.

They found that for every 10 mg/dL increase in blood sugar, the risk of delivering a baby with congenital heart disease rose about 8 percent.

The association between elevated blood sugar in early pregnancy and congenital heart disease risk was better than the predictive ability of the oral glucose tolerance test, which is currently used to identify mothers at risk for carrying children with congenital heart disease, researchers said.

Emmi Helle, M.D., Ph.D., M.Sc. (Economics), Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Location: Science and Technology Hall, Special Focus Theater

Embargo: 2 p.m. CT/3 p.m. ET

Poster: M2164 – Session: HT.APS.P197

iPhone camera application may detect atrial fibrillation

A smartphone application made it possible to use the iPhone camera to detect atrial fibrillation via facial signals and without physical contact, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

The technology, called Cardiio Rhythm, detects subtle beat-to-beat variations in facial skin color, which reflect a person’s heart rate fluctuation. They tested the app on 85 hospitalized patients, comparing the app to recordings on a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG).

The 12-lead ECG detected atrial fibrillation in 25 of the 85 patients. The smartphone application correctly identified more than 92 percent of cases with atrial fibrillation and nearly 95 percent of cases without atrial fibrillation.

The convenience of a contact-free approach makes the technology attractive for large-scale community atrial fibrillation screenings, researchers said.

Bryan P. Yan, M.B.B.S., The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Location: Science and Technology Hall, Population Science Section

Embargo: 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET

Presentation: 711 – Session: HY.RFO.13

Dramatic drops in blood pressure may be associated with a higher risk of death

In some non-diabetic hypertensive patients, dramatic drops from higher to lower systolic blood pressure may be associated with a higher risk of death, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Researchers reviewed data on nearly 8,000 non-diabetic adults with high blood pressure. They found those who had systolic blood pressures of 164 mm Hg or higher before being treated and achieved an average systolic pressure of less than 142 mm Hg during treatment were 32 percent more likely to die compared to adults with the same level of systolic pressure prior to treatment but who only achieved average systolic pressures greater or equal to 152 mm Hg during treatment.

In contrast, adults with initial systolic blood pressures of 164 mm Hg or less had a 40 percent lower risk of dying if they reduced their pressure to 142 compared to those who reduced to an average 152 mm Hg or higher.

As compared to a prior study (SPRINT), some patients whose higher baseline systolic blood pressure was reduced dramatically with treatment may not necessarily have a lower risk of death. Further research is needed to understand these findings.

Peter Okin, M.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York.

(Scientific presentation is 3:10 p.m. CT/4:10 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 14, 2016.)

Location: Science and Technology Hall, Population Science Section and Clinical Science Theater II

Embargo: 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET

Presentation: 710 – Session: HY.RFO.13

Offspring may have higher risk for developing hypertension if their parents had hypertension before age 55

If your parents were diagnosed with high blood pressure before age 55, you may be at higher risk for developing high blood pressure than if they developed hypertension at a later age, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.

Framingham Heart Study researchers examined blood pressure information collected on parents and their offspring since as early as 1948. Specifically, they looked at 1,635 adult children (average age 32) who did not have high blood pressure at the start. Of the offspring studied: group 1 had no parents with high blood pressure; group 2 had one or more parents with late-onset hypertension, meaning they were diagnosed at age 55 or older; group 3 had one parent with early-onset high blood pressure; and group 4 had both parents with early-onset hypertension. They found:

  • The offspring who were most likely to develop hypertension were those whose mother and father had early-onset hypertension.

  • When individuals with non-hypertensive parents, group 1, were followed for a decade, 6 percent of them developed high blood pressure. This portion in group 2 was 8 percent; in group 3 it was 11 percent; and in group 4, where both parents had early-onset hypertension, it was 19 percent.

  • The offspring's high blood pressure risk increased by about 50 percent from group 1 to group 2. And from group 1 to group 4, offspring with both parents having early-onset hypertension had 3.5 times the risk of hypertension compared to offspring whose parents had normal blood pressure.

Finally, the researchers found that the earlier in life the parents developed hypertension, the earlier their offspring did also. It may be important to differentiate between early- and late-onset parental hypertension when estimating an individual's hypertension risk, researchers said.

Teemu Niiranen, M.D., Ph.D., Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts.

Location: Science and Technology Hall, Clinical Science Theater II

Additional Resources:

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