American Heart Association/American Stroke Association sending televangelist Pat Robertson wishes for a speedy recovery after suffering a stroke

February 05, 2018 Categories: Advisories & Comments

DALLAS, February 5, 2018 — Longtime televangelist Pat Robertson is recovering after suffering an embolic stroke Friday evening, according to the Christian Broadcasting Network, the Virginia-based television network he founded.

An embolic stroke, a type of ischemic stroke, occurs when a blood clot that forms in the body breaks loose and lodges in an artery blocking the flow of blood to the brain. 

Last month the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association announced new treatment guidelines for ischemic stroke. The new guidelines recommend an increased treatment window for mechanical clot removal from six hours to up to 24 hours in certain patients with clots in large vessels. The new recommendations also mean that more patients will have access to a clot-dissolving drug, which may reduce disability.

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot (called an ischemic stroke) or bursts causing bleeding in the brain (called a hemorrhagic stroke). In either case, some of the brain cells cannot get the blood (and oxygen) they need and those brain cells die.

Stroke is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of long term disability in the United States, but what many people may not know is that stroke is largely treatable and the faster you are treated, the greater your chances are for a positive outcome.

For the most common stroke warning signs, remember F.A.S.T.:

F- Face drooping, A- Arm weakness, S- Speech difficulty, T- Time to call 9-1-1. 

With ischemic strokes, restoring blood flow immediately is of great benefit, and with all kinds of strokes, getting to an appropriate hospital immediately is essential. Call 9-1-1 if someone is experiencing signs of a stroke.

For more information about stroke, including a complete list of the stroke warning signs, visit StrokeAssociation.org.

###

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the Association's science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical companies and device manufacturers, is available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For Media Inquiries: 214-706-1173

For Public Inquiries: (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org