Market stabilization, affordability reforms and bipartisanship should be next steps in health care debate, says American Heart Association

August 01, 2017 Categories: Advocacy News

WASHINGTON, D.C., August 1, 2017 — American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments following the failed passage of the Health Care Freedom Act in the U.S. Senate:

“The Senate vote on the skinny repeal bill made it apparent that many lawmakers shared our apprehensions regarding this legislation, particularly when it came to ensuring access and coverage for Americans with preexisting health conditions. But at the same time, too many Americans, including those with cardiovascular disease and stroke, continue to worry about how they will pay for their health care.

In the aftermath, we appeal to Congress and the administration to work together in a bipartisan fashion to find solutions that can unite our country in the shared goal of providing high quality health care for all Americans. Any next steps must first include an effort by Congress to address the current instability in the individual insurance market and to make a commitment to support the cost-sharing reductions in addition to other short-term measures. Secondly, we encourage Congress to examine the important issue of affordability in an open and transparent manner using the legislative process to solicit input and engage all stakeholders in committee hearings and public dialogue. Obviously, the behind-closed-doors approach to the complex problems facing the nation’s health care system was not successful in the Senate. We believe a return to ‘regular order’ and bipartisanship is far more likely to yield the sustainable outcomes the American people want and deserve from our elected officials. 

The association stands ready to bring our experience and our knowledge of patient challenges and priorities to both these efforts in the coming weeks.”

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About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the Association's science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical companies and device manufacturers, is available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For Media Inquiries: (214) 706-1173

Retha Sherrod: retha.sherrod@heart.org, 202-785-7929

For Public Inquiries: (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and strokeassociation.org