MONDAY, NOV. 9, 2015 NEWS TIPS

November 09, 2015 Categories: Scientific Conferences & Meetings

Tip Headlines:

  • Hispanics largely undertreated for high cholesterol
  • Cardiovascular disease on the rise as fewer people achieve ideal cardiovascular health
  • 3D printing can make pills tailored to individual needs
  • Healthcare disparities more often affect women and black heart disease patients

NOTE: ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN. ALL TIPS ARE EMBARGOED UNTIL THE TIME OF PRESENTATION OR 4 P.M. ET EACH DAY, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST.

Embargo: 9 a.m. ET

Abstract 13457 (Hall A2, Poster M 2146)

Hispanics largely undertreated for high cholesterol

Only one-third to one-half of Hispanics eligible to be treated with cholesterol-lowering statins are taking them, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers evaluated the need for high cholesterol treatment among 16,415 U.S. Hispanic/Latino adults. They found:

  • 10.4 percent were being treated with statins.

  • 20.5 percent were eligible for treatment based on recommendations for statin therapy eligibility under the 3rd National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel.

  • 32.1 percent were eligible for the therapy under the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) treatment guidelines.

The proportion of statin-eligible adults grew among older adults according to both recommendations and among males in the ACC/AHA guidelines. There was also an increase in eligibility for statin therapy in middle-aged adults.

Researchers said regardless of the definition for statin eligibility, Hispanics are largely undertreated.

Waqas T. Qureshi M.D. M.S.; Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina;

Note: Actual presentation is 2 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 9, 2015.

 

Embargo: 9 a.m. ET

Abstract 17357 (Hall A2, Poster M 2120)

Cardiovascular disease on the rise as fewer people achieve ideal cardiovascular health

The number of people who have the ideal cardiovascular health score, as defined by the goals in the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7, has decreased during the last 20 years, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

There have also been increases in the proportions of people having precursors of cardiovascular disease, as well as in those having diagnosed cardiovascular disease.

The American Heart Association defines ideal cardiovascular health as meeting seven health metrics: eating a balanced diet, being active, managing your weight, eliminating tobacco smoke, and maintaining ideal levels of blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure; achieving these metrics has been associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease.

In this study, researchers studied the prevalence of the ideal cardiovascular health score among 3,460 adults, who were measured for the metrics from one to four times during 1990 to 2008 as part of the Framingham Heart Study.

They found:

  • The proportion of people with an ideal score decreased from 8.5 percent during the period 1991-1995 to 5.8 percent during 2005-2008. The drop was due to decreases in the number of people with ideal body mass index, blood pressure, glucose or cholesterol levels.

  • People whose health scores changed by at least 15 percent (for example, dropping from an ideal status on a health metric to intermediate or poor status) had 1.6-times higher odds of being diagnosed with a precursor of cardiovascular disease and a 1.2-times higher rate of being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease, compared to those who kept their health scores high for the majority of the health metrics.

Researchers said their findings emphasize the importance of maintaining ideal cardiovascular health scores over a lifetime.

Vanessa Xanthakis, Ph.D.; Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.

Note: Actual presentation is 2 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 9, 2015.

 

Embargo: 9 a.m. ET

Abstract 17443 (Hall A2, Poster M 2081)

3D printing can make pills tailored to individual needs

Personalized medications, based on a person’s medical and biological profiles, can be produced with high precision through 3D printing, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Traditional pre-formulated medicines don’t allow for customization that accounts for a patient’s weight, race, kidney and liver functions – which can increase effectiveness and reduce side effects. 

A research team from Wake Forest University, Columbia University and University of North Carolina developed a prototype computer algorithm, including software for 3D printing with dosage-adjustment information. After inputting patients’ individual medical and biological characteristics, the software calculates personalized doses and automatically generates 3D printing data. Researchers tested the accuracy and variability of five different doses of 80 total 3D-printed “pills” in the testing material.

All tested pills, ranging in dose from 124 milligrams (mg) to 373 mg, were successfully printed using a 3D-printer. There was high reproducibility and little variability.

This study shows the concept of 3D printing to produce personalized pills is possible and potentially provides a new method to formulate medicines based on a patient’s clinical characteristics. More research is needed to develop a standard adjustment formula for individual drugs, as well as cost-effective 3D drug printing techniques, researchers said.

Min Pu, M.D.; Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; 

Note: Actual presentation is 2 p.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 9, 2015.

 

Embargo: 11:15 a.m. ET

Abstract 269 (Room W 203)

Healthcare disparities more often affect women and black heart disease patients

Women with heart disease are less likely than men to receive optimal care at discharge from U.S. hospitals — a gender disparity that leads to a higher death rate among women with heart disease, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Black patients with heart disease also have a higher death rate after hospital discharge than white patients, but this disparity cannot be explained by the differences in hospitals’ quality of care.

Researchers referred to the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines Coronary Artery Disease (GWTG-CAD) registry linked with Medicare inpatient data. The study included 49,358 Medicare patients hospitalized at 366 U.S. hospitals from 2003 to 2009. They analyzed quality of care (based on how many performance measures hospitals followed for eligible patients) and three-year death rates from any cause after being discharged.

Among the 16,130 deaths identified at the follow-up, researchers found women were less likely to receive optimal care at discharge and, when they received suboptimal care, were 23 percent more likely to die than men. The disparity disappeared when women received optimal care.

While researchers found no difference in care quality across racial and ethnic groups, as well as across geographic regions, they did uncover a 36 percent higher likelihood that blacks would die compared to whites. The disparity remained regardless of the care quality.

The observed disparity in death rate between men and women could be reduced by providing equitable and optimal care. The same does not appear to be true for the disparity that exists between black and white patients, researchers said.

Deepak L. Bhatt, M.D., M.P.H.; Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Boston, Massachusetts; 

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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