SATURDAY NEWS TIPS

These tips are part of the Resuscitation Science Symposium, Nov. 16-17, taking place during Scientific Sessions.

November 16, 2013 Categories: Heart News, Scientific Conferences & Meetings

Tip Highlights:

  • Blood transfusions en route to hospital may reduce trauma patients’ risk of death.
  • One minute of CPR video training could save lives.
  • Hospitalized children more likely to die after cardiac arrest during night shift.

All Tips below are embargoed for 11 a.m. CT/12 p.m. ET Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013.

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RESS Abstract 19455/4 (Omni Dallas Hotel, Trinity Ballroom)

Blood transfusions en route to hospital may reduce trauma patients’ risk of death

More adult trauma patients survived when they received early transfusions of plasma or red blood cells while en route to the hospital by helicopter or ground transport, in a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Trauma is the leading cause of death in people 1 to 44 years old and the leading cause of years of life lost, researchers said.

In a retrospective study, 97 patients received pre-hospital transfusions and 480 patients who didn’t receive pre-hospital transfusions were controls.

Pre-hospital transfusions resulted in an 8 percent reduced risk of death within six hours after hospital admission and 40 percent improved coagulation status upon hospital admission. There was also a 13 percent improvement in survival to hospital discharge, although this was not statistically significant, researchers said.

Patients arrived by either ground or two different helicopter systems, one of which had thawed plasma and the other air and ground transport systems used only crystalloid resuscitation (normal saline solution is the most common crystalloid fluid used).

“Earlier, effective intervention seems to have the best effect on outcomes, such as pre-hospital transfusions on trauma patients that can save lives,” said John Holcomb, M.D., the study’s lead researcher.

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RESS Abstract 19453/157 (Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas Ballroom D-H)

One minute of CPR video training could save lives

Just one minute of CPR video training for bystanders in a shopping mall could save lives in emergencies, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Researchers used a one-minute CPR video to improve responsiveness and teach compression only CPR to people with no CPR experience.

Participants were divided into two groups: 48 adults looked at the video, while 47 sat idle for one minute. In a private area with a mannequin simulating a sudden collapse, both groups were asked to do “what they thought best.” Researchers measured responsiveness as time to call 9-1-1 and start chest compression and CPR quality reflected by chest compression depth, rate and hands-off interval time.

Adults who saw the CPR video called 9-1-1 more frequently, initiated chest compression sooner, had an increased chest compression rate and a decreased hands-off interval, researchers said.

“Given the short length of training, these findings suggest that ultra-brief video training may have potential as a universal intervention for public venues to help bystander reaction and improve CPR skills,” said Ashish Panchal, M.D., Ph.D. lead researcher of the study.

Note: Actual presentation is 5:15 p.m. CT/6:15 p.m. ET Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013.

Resource: Hands-Only CPR kiosk at DFW Airport.

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RESS Abstract 11975/11 (Omni Dallas Hotel, Trinity Ballroom)

Hospitalized children more likely to die after cardiac arrest during night shift

Hospitalized children are more likely to die after a cardiac arrest if it occurs during the night shift, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Adults who suffer a cardiac arrest while hospitalized are already known to fare worse if resuscitation is needed during the night shift.

This AHA Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation Registry study is the first documentation of a similar effect in children.

Of 10,541 consecutive cardiac arrests in patients under age 18 in 2000-10, the researchers found:

  • Thirty-four percent of children survived to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest during the night shift (11 p.m.-6:59 a.m.).
  • Thirty-eight percent of children survived after cardiac arrest on day or evening shifts.
  • Survival following nightshift cardiac arrest was 13 percent lower after accounting for differences in patient and hospital characteristics.

Note: Actual presentation is 10 a.m. CT/ 11 a.m. ET Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013.

Resources:

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Additional Resources related to these tips are on the right column of the release link at

http://newsroom.heart.org/news/saturday-news-tips?preview=8432e3d29fcab59bdd95d334c2e6d5d8.

For more news from AHA Scientific Sessions 2013 follow us on Twitter @HeartNews #AHA13.

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position.  The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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