TUESDAY NEWS TIPS

March 03, 2015 Categories: Scientific Conferences & Meetings, Heart News

Tip headlines:

  • Let’s “get physical” to improve sleep quality in young adults

  • Automated text messaging may improve heart patients’ adherence to medications

  • The more fried food consumed, the bigger the heart failure risk

  • Medical advice to limit salt intake may help adults reduce sodium

Embargoed until 4 p.m. ET, Tuesday, March 3, 2015 – Abstract P071

Let’s “get physical” to improve sleep quality in young adults

Young adults might sleep better if they increased their physical activity and decreased their sedentary behavior, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

Researchers looked at how different physical activity levels and types of sedentary behaviors impact the quality and duration of sleep in a study of 658 young adults.

They found:

  • Each additional 10 minutes of moderate physical activity was associated with greater general sleep quality.

  • Watching television and computer use was associated with poorer sleep quality.

    Clinicians who treat sleep problems in young adults should consider taking physical activity and sedentary behavior into account when prescribing treatment plans, researchers said.

    Lisa Kakinami, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the PERFORM Centre, Condordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

    No outside funding was received for this study.

    Note: Actual presentation is scheduled for 5 p.m. ET Tuesday, March 3, 2015.

    Embargoed until 4 p.m. ET, Tuesday, March 3, 2015 – Abstract P93

    Automated text messaging may improve heart patients’ adherence to medications

    Automated text messages that remind cardiac patients to take their medications may improve the likelihood that patients will take their medication, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

    Researchers developed an automated text message system to help remind patients to take their medications. They recruited 30 stable cardiac patients who received text message reminders up to four times daily for one month and then didn’t receive any text message reminders during the next month.

    They found:

  • All 30 patients improved adherence with text message reminders.

  • Patients were 64 percent less likely to miss taking their medications if they received the text message reminders.

When patients didn’t receive the text message reminders, there were some groups of patients that were more likely than others to miss their medications. These included older patients (average age 65 years), patients with depression and patients with less than a 12th grade education. However, these subgroups showed even greater improvements with the text message reminder intervention than other patients in the study.

This text messaging intervention represents a potentially simple and accessible method for improving medication adherence, researchers said.

Avinash Pandy, the study author, is a high school student who conducted this study under the guidance of his mentor, Niteesh K. Choudhry., M.D., Ph.D., executive director of the Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

Note: Actual presentation is scheduled for 5 p.m. ET Tuesday, March 3, 2015.

Embargoed until 4 p.m. ET, Tuesday, March 3, 2015 – Abstract MP16

The more fried food consumed, the bigger the heart failure risk

Note: this contains new data from the author updated after the abstract was submitted.

A large study of men suggests fried food consumption is associated with a higher risk of heart failure, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

Studies have shown eating fried foods can lead to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.

Researchers in this study looked at the association between frequency of fried food consumption and heart failure by analyzing the findings of a study of 15,362 male physicians in the U.S., who had reported their frequency of fried food consumption during a three-year period. In an average follow up of 9.6 years, there were 632 new heart failure cases. Researchers found compared to those who reported eating fried food less than once a week:

  • men who ate it one to three times a week were an average 23 percent more likely to be diagnosed with heart failure during follow up;

  • those who ate it four to six times a week had an average 26 percent higher risk; and

  • those eating fried foods seven times and more a week were 100 percent more likely to develop heart failure.

This study was funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Luc Djousse, M.D., Sc.D. and associate professor of medicine Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

Note: Actual presentation is scheduled for 5 p.m. ET Tuesday, March 3, 2015.

Embargoed until 4 p.m. ET, Tuesday, March 3, 2015 – Abstract PO36

Medical advice to limit salt intake may help adults reduce sodium

Medical advice to limit salt may be a powerful motivator for many adults to reduce their salt intake, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle 2015 meeting.

Researchers in this study reviewed telephone survey information from 173,778 U.S. adults to determine the impact of receiving medical advice to lower dietary sodium.

They found:

  • Of those who reported receiving advice from a doctor or other health professional, eighty-two percent reported taking action to reduce sodium intake

Receiving advice was associated with a 59 percent increased likelihood of taking action to reduce sodium intake.

The proportion of adults who did not report receiving advice suggests health professionals may be missing a “teachable moment,” researchers said.

Sandra L. Jackson, Ph.D., M.P.H., epidemic intelligence service fellow, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, Ga.

No outside funding was received for this study

Note: Actual presentation is scheduled for 5 p.m. ET Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association Stroke scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position.  The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events.  The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content.  Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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