Tuesday News Tips

March 01, 2016 Categories: Scientific Conferences & Meetings

Tip Headlines:

  • Children tend to share their caregivers’ unhealthy metabolic risk factors
  • Tea drinking linked to better heart health

Embargoed for 3 p.m. MT/ 5 p.m. ET, Tuesday, March 1, 2016 — Abstract 463

Children tend to share their caregivers’ unhealthy metabolic risk factors

Children are often just like their caregivers when it comes to sharing metabolic risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol and unhealthy levels of abdominal fat, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers studied nearly 1,500 boys and girls, ages eight to 16, and 1,020 caregivers.

They found that girls were about four times and boys nearly seven times more likely to be obese when their caregivers were obese. After adjustments, girls and boys were likely to have similar trends as their caregivers’ measures of body fat, blood pressure and cholesterol.

In addition, when adult caregivers had at least one cardiovascular risk factor, the youth living in their homes were twice as likely to also have a cardiovascular risk factor.

These findings highlight the need for family-based healthy living interventions, according to the authors.

Mercedes Carnethon, Ph.D., associate professor in preventive medicine-epidemiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Note: Actual presentation is 5:30 p.m. MT/7:30 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Mar. 1, 2016.

 

Embargoed for 3 p.m. MT/ 5 p.m. ET, Tuesday, March 1, 2016 — Abstract 340

Tea drinking linked to better heart health

Drinking tea is associated with decreased coronary artery progression and a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers studied available information on 6,212 adults to determine how tea drinking might be associated with coronary artery calcium progression, a marker for blood vessel disease, and heart attacks, angina (chest pain), cardiac arrest, stroke and death from other types of heart disease. They divided the participants into those who never drank tea, less than one-cup-a-day drinkers, one cup-a-day drinkers, two to three cups a day and four or more cups a day tea drinkers.

The study followed patients for an average 11.1 years for major cardiovascular events and more than five years to determine changes in coronary artery calcium scores.

The researchers found that adults who drank one and two to three cups of tea daily had more favorable coronary calcium scores than those who never drank tea.

They also noted a graded relationship between the amount of tea a person drank and a progressively lower incidence of major heart-related events starting with the one-cup-a-day tea drinkers, versus never tea drinkers.

Elliott Miller, M.D., instructor of medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland.

Note: Actual presentation is 5:30 p.m. MT/7:30 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Mar. 1, 2016.

Additional Resources:

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