TUESDAY NEWS TIPS

Tip Highlights:

  • Disappearing stent continues protection for three years.
  • Nano-particles successfully deliver medication to artery plaque.
  • Older sedentary adults reduced injury to heart through moderate physical activity.
  • Younger Hispanic women face higher risk of death from heart attack.
  • Bedtime aspirin may reduce risk of morning heart attack.

NOTE: ALL TIMES ARE CENTRAL. ALL TIPS ARE EMBARGOED UNTIL THE TIME OF PRESENTATION OR 3 P.M. CT/4 PM ET EACH DAY, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST.

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Embargo: 2:15 p.m. CT/3:15 p.m. ET

Abstract 11264 (Room D162)

Disappearing stent continues protection for three years

Propping open clogged heart arteries with a “disappearing stent” has worked well for three years in the first people implanted with the unique device, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

The new bioabsorbable magnesium stent (DREAMS) is a drug-releasing tube that is reabsorbed over time, leaving behind a healthy vessel and reducing clotting that sometimes occurs 12-24 months after implantation of a traditional drug-coated stent.

Of 46 people implanted with the stent, the failure rate was 6.8 percent, with two patients requiring vessel-opening procedures and one suffering a heart attack during angiography one year after receiving the stent.

During the second year, no patient had a heart attack, heart-related death or developed a blood clot within the stent. Various imaging techniques confirmed that the stents were being absorbed as planned.

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Embargo: 2:30 p.m. CT/3:30 p.m. ET

Abstract 11287 (Room D162)

Nano-particles successfully deliver medication to artery plaque

Microscopic nano-particles can successfully deliver medication to artery plaque — potentially reducing side effects in other parts of the body, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Researchers used nano-particles to deliver the anti-inflammatory medication prednisolone to dangerous plaque in seven patients scheduled for vascular surgery. Tests on white blood cells within the plaque revealed that the nano-particles delivered the medication successfully to the diseased areas.

The same researchers performed a randomized clinical trial in 30 vascular patients using the nano-particle delivery method or a placebo and were able to report results of the delivered medications effect on atrial wall inflammation.

Other pre-clinical tests in animals showed arterial wall inflammation was reduced; in the human tests the medication, prednisolone, increased arterial wall inflammation.

Despite the negative medication results, the nano-particle delivery system successfully transported prednisolone to arterial plaque and can now be used to test other anti-inflammatory medications in these high-risk patients, researchers said.

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Embargo: 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET

Abstract 16937 (Hall F, Core 2, Poster Board: 2057)

Older sedentary adults reduced injury to heart through moderate physical activity

Moderate physical activity in sedentary older adults reduced the progression of injury to the heart, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

In a pilot study, 310 adults 70 years and older with a previously sedentary lifestyle, were randomly assigned to one-year supervised physical activity or to health education controls.

Troponin T, a blood-based injury marker which historically has been used for the diagnosis of heart attack was measured with a new high sensitive cardiac assay (hs cTnT).

The levels, measured at baseline and at one year, had more than a three times increase in the control population than in the exercise group, researchers said.

“Our findings suggest biochemical evidence to support the old adage, ‘You’re never too old to start a physical activity program to improve cardiac health,’” said Christopher DeFilippi, M.D., study lead author.

Researchers will further explore the impact of exercise on successful aging in a National Institute of Aging study.

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Embargo: 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET

Abstract 15362 (Hall F, Core 2, Poster Board: 2180)

Younger Hispanic women face higher risk of death from heart attack

Younger Hispanic women face a higher risk of death in hospitals after a heart attack, are more likely to suffer from co-existing conditions such as diabetes, and are less likely to undergo percutaneous coronary interventions or coronary artery bypass surgery as compared with white women and men, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Researchers analyzed a large in-patient population of about 207,000 heart attack hospitalizations for adult men and women with race/ethnicity data, including more than 6,500 Hispanic and black women less than 65 years old. Hispanic and black women were significantly younger at the time of hospitalization for heart attack compared with their white counterparts.

Researchers found:

  • After adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, younger Hispanic, black and white women were 1.5, 1.4, and 1.2 times more likely, respectively to experience higher in-hospital death compared with white men.
  • Younger Hispanic women also suffered the highest rates of diabetes at 55.9 percent compared with 46.1 percent of black women and 35.9 percent of white women.
  • 47.4 percent black women, 50.1 percent of Hispanic women and 58.2 percent of white women had percutaneous coronary interventions or coronary artery bypass surgery compared to 73.3 percent of white men.

Doctors may not recognize risk factors and symptoms for young women suffering from ischemic heart disease and younger Hispanic women in particular, researchers said. Other factors include language barriers, lack of access to health care, provider bias and differences in treatment patterns.

“Our findings of striking racial/ethnic, gender and age disparities in heart attack treatment patterns and outcomes suggest that young minority women should be targeted for both primary and secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease,” said Fatima Rodriguez, M.D., M.P.H., study leading author, Internal Medicine Resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston, Mass.

Resource:  Hispanics and Heart Disease

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Embargo: 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET

Abstract 19559 (Clinical Science: Special Reports III -- Ballrooms C1&C2)

Bedtime aspirin may reduce risk of morning heart attack

Taking aspirin at bedtime instead of in the morning might reduce acute heart events, according a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Low-dose daily aspirin is recommended for people at high risk of heart disease and for reducing the risk of recurrent heart events. Aspirin thins the blood and makes it less likely to clot. The tendency for platelet activity to be higher peaks in the morning.

The Aspirin in Reduction of Tension II trial is the first study to explore the timing of aspirin intake among cardiovascular disease patients. In the randomized, open-label study, 290 patients took either 100 mg of aspirin upon waking or at bedtime during two 3-month periods. At the end of each period, blood pressure and platelet activity was measured.

Blood pressure was not reduced; however, bedtime aspirin platelet activity was reduced by 22 units (aspirin reaction units).

“Because higher platelet activity contributes to a higher risk of acute heart events , this simple intervention – switching aspirin intake from morning to bedtime – could be beneficial for the millions of patients with heart disease who take aspirin on a daily basis,” said Tobias Bonten, M.D., Ph.D student at the Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands.

Note: Actual presentation is 3:45 p.m. CT/4:45p.m. ET Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013.

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Additional resources related to these tips are on the right column of the release link at

http://newsroom.heart.org/news/tuesday-news-tips?preview=b2873852502cdfc35fa2339bd73262ee.

For more news from AHA Scientific Sessions 2013 follow us on Twitter @HeartNews #AHA13.

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

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