TUESDAY, NOV. 10, 2015 NEWS TIPS

Tip Headlines:

  • Smartphone compatible listening device may rival gold standard stethoscope
  • Alcohol abuse may predict congestive heart failure; even among younger adults
  • Women experience more psychological distress after heart transplant
  • Achieving Life’s Simple 7 reduces more than heart disease
  • Children with congenital heart disease not performing as well in school
  • Tobacco use fueled by e-cigs, hookah remains high among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos
  • Lowering China’s pollution could prevent about 900,000 cardiovascular deaths by 2030
  • Cardiac rehab coverage expands for chronic heart failure patients with symptoms

NOTE: ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN. ALL TIPS ARE EMBARGOED UNTIL THE TIME OF PRESENTATION OR 4 P.M. ET EACH DAY, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST.

Embargo: 9 a.m. ET

Abstract 14852 (Hall A2, Poster T 2006)

Smartphone compatible listening device may rival gold standard stethoscope

HeartBuds, a smartphone compatible listening device for cardiovascular sounds, works as well as widely used FDA-approved traditional and digital stethoscopes and better than FDA-approved disposable stethoscopes, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

An essential part of a physical examination is listening to patients internal sounds, made possible by stethoscopes. Researchers compared HeartBuds’ acoustic quality to three stethoscope types: a disposable stethoscope commonly used in hospitals to reduce infection rates; a gold standard cardiology stethoscope used by most physicians; as well as a popular digital stethoscope. Independent examiners used each of the stethoscopes to examine 50 adults and rated the devices.

Researchers found the disposable stethoscope was notably worse at identifying heart murmurs and performed poorly when trying to detect abnormal sounds in the neck that would indicate possible carotid artery disease. Researchers rated the HeartBuds stethoscope as comparable in sound quality to the more traditional and electronic stethoscopes.

Ritesh S. Patel; University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; David Bello, M.D. and Arnold Einhorn, M.D., Orlando Health Heart Institute.

 

Embargo: 9 a.m. ET

Abstract 11944 (Hall A2, Poster T 4132)

Alcohol abuse may predict congestive heart failure; even among younger adults

Alcohol abuse was associated with a 70 percent increased risk of congestive heart failure in adults and the link was especially strong among younger adults (60 years or younger) and those without high blood pressure, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers analyzed 858,187 patients randomly selected from a California database of all emergency department, ambulatory procedural and inpatient healthcare encounters between 2005 and 2009. Patient ages ranged from 30s to 70s; and more than a third were men and almost half were white.

During study follow-up, 4 percent, or 33,046 patients, were diagnosed with alcohol abuse and 12 percent, or 106,655, developed congestive heart failure.

Alcohol abuse emerged as a strong predictor of congestive heart failure after adjustment for age, gender, race, high blood pressure, diabetes, coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease, valvular heart disease, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and income.

Researchers said their study suggests younger adults and those without high blood pressure might be disproportionately prone to the toxic heart effects from alcohol.

Isaac R. Whitman, M.D.; University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California;

 

Embargo: 10 a.m. ET

Abstract 399 (Room W224CD)

Women experience more psychological distress after heart transplant

Women experience more symptoms of depression and anxiety, and feel they have less control over their heart health in the first 100 days after a heart transplant compared to their male counterparts, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Early psychological distress after a heart transplant is linked to poor medication compliance and higher risks of infection.

To determine how men and women heart transplant patients shoulder psychological burdens, researchers studied 91 heart transplant patients (29 percent women) in the first 100 days after surgery. They found:

  • 39 percent of women, versus 15 percent of men, experienced high depressive symptoms.

  • 77 percent of women, versus 46 percent of men, experienced high levels of anxiety.

  • A scoring system indicated that women felt they had less control over their health than men.

Researchers suggest that healthcare providers monitor these symptoms early after a heart transplant, especially in women. The development of gender-specific interventions aimed at helping people through the heart transplantation transition are needed.

Lynn Doering, R.N., Ph.D., FAAN; UCLA School of Nursing, Los Angeles, California;

 

Embargo: 11:45 a.m. ET

Abstract 422 (Room W203)

Achieving Life’s Simple 7 reduces more than heart disease

Achieving the seven heart-health metrics of the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 also helps reduce many other chronic diseases, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers analyzed the health information of 6,814 adults, who were followed for an average 10.2 years. Each component of the Life’s Simple 7 metrics (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet, total cholesterol, blood pressure and blood glucose) was categorized into three levels: ideal, intermediate and poor. Rates of non-cardiovascular diseases overall were lower with improving Life’s Simple 7 health status. They also found compared to those in the poor category, people in the ideal category of the Life’s Simple 7 score had a:

  • 20 percent lower risk for cancer;

  • 62 percent lower risk for chronic kidney disease;

  • 43 percent lower risk for pneumonia; and

  • 49 percent lower risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Researchers said their results suggest that achieving these seven ideal heart health metrics can reduce the burden of many chronic diseases.

Oluseye Ogunmoroti, M.D., M.P.H.; Baptist Health South Florida, Miami;

 

Embargo: 2 p.m. ET

Abstract 15999 (Hall A2, Poster T 3044)

Children with congenital heart disease not performing as well in school

Children with congenital heart disease do not perform as well in school as children without birth defects, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Researchers used North Carolina third-grade public school records to compare end-of-grade test results for children born with congenital heart disease to those of children without birth defects in 1998-2003.Compared to children without a birth defect, those with congenital heart disease were:

  • 40 percent more likely not to meet proficiency standards in reading;

  • 20 percent more likely not to meet standards in math;

  • 50 percent more likely not to meet those standards in both subjects; and

  • 2.8 percent were held back in the third grade (compared to 1.9 percent of children without birth defects).

A child’s history of congenital heart disease is important in determining a student’s need for specialized education services, according to the authors.

Matthew Oster, M.D., M.P.H.; Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia;

 

Embargo: 4 p.m. ET

Abstract 323 (Room W224AB)

Tobacco use fueled by e-cigs, hookah remains high among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos

Tobacco use remains a serious problem among Hispanic/Latino adults, with increasing use and acceptance of e-cigarettes and hookah among younger tobacco users living in the United States, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Hookah, also known as a water pipe, consists of a bowl, a chamber partially filled with water, hose and mouthpiece. It is designed to burn specialty tobacco which is typically flavored.

To better understand Hispanics’/Latinos’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviors regarding the use of tobacco products, as well as how these might differ across Hispanic/Latino ethnicities, researchers conducted 26 focus groups with smokers and nonsmokers. The focus groups included 180 Hispanic/Latino participants, 18 to 64 years of age, residing in varying U.S. locations where particular ethnic subgroups have settled: Chicago (Central and South Americans), New York City (Puerto Ricans and Dominicans), San Diego (Mexican/Mexican Americans) and Miami (Cubans). Participants were recruited based on their birthplace (mainland U.S. vs elsewhere) and use of the English language as an index of acculturation (gradual process whereby immigrants incorporate the beliefs and behaviors of the mainstream culture).

Researchers found that regardless of the specific ethnic background and geographic location:

  • Hispanic/Latino participants reported substantial use of e-cigarettes and/or hookah.

  • Spanish-speaking immigrants who were 36 to 64 years were least likely to use these alternative tobacco products, whereas younger Latino smokers who were 18-35 reported significantly greater use.

Easy access to these products, the appeal of flavored tobacco products’ taste and smell, minimal restrictions on public use, and use while socializing were cited as reasons contributing to these products desirability.

Aida L. Giachello, Ph.D.; Northwestern University, Chicago; 

Note: Actual presentation is 4:45 p.m. ET, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015.

 

Embargo: 4 p.m. ET

Abstract 562 (Room W202)

Lowering China’s pollution could prevent about 900,000 cardiovascular deaths by 2030

Air pollution is a leading cardiovascular disease risk factor in Beijing and urban China. Lowering air pollution to the level it was during the 2008 Beijing Olympics could prevent about 900,000 cardiovascular deaths and gain millions of life years in urban China by 2030, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

To reduce pollution for the 2008 Olympics, the government temporarily closed factories, construction sites and limited auto traffic. In the study, researchers simulated two air quality improvement scenarios and projected the results based on available research. One simulation was of the air quality during the 2008 Beijing Olympics, which was a fine particle matter (PM2.5) level of 55 μg/m3. The other was of the World Health Organization’s recommendation of 10 μg/m3. They also projected the effect of a 50 percent reduction in smoking, second hand smoke and lowering systolic high blood pressure to 140 mm Hg, each over 5 years.

Researchers found that gradually achieving 2008 Olympic air quality levels over 10 years would:

  • reduce stroke deaths by 2.7 percent and reduce coronary heart disease deaths by 7.2 percent from 2015 to 2030; and

  • prevent 304,000 stroke deaths, 619,000 coronary heart disease deaths and gain 4.2 million life years from 2015 to 2030.

The more aggressive World Health Organization pollution goal would yield greater life year gains than tobacco or systolic blood pressure control.

Chen Huang, Ph.D. candidate; Fuwai Hospital, Beijing, China;

Note: Actual presentation is 5:45 p.m. ET Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015.

 

Embargo: 4 p.m. ET

Abstract 550 (Room W300)

Cardiac rehab coverage expands for chronic heart failure patients with symptoms

Medicare’s and Medicaid’s newly extended cardiac rehabilitation coverage for chronic heart failure patients with symptoms has tripled the number who are now eligible, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

Chronic heart failure patients are at high risk for serious health problems and declines. The new coverage includes those who are on optimal medical therapy and have less than 35 percent ejection fraction, which is a measure of the heart’s pumping ability.

Researchers analyzed Medicare patient information in the Get With The Guidelines-Heart Failure registry from 2008 to 2012, comparing patients who were previously eligible for cardiac rehab due to prior heart attack, heart valve surgery or other events in the previous 12 months; newly eligible heart failure patients; and patients who are ineligible for cardiac rehabilitation.

They found that newly eligible patients were more likely to be black and have atrial fibrillation, while having fewer previous hospitalizations than patients previously eligible for cardiac rehabilitation. Newly eligible and ineligible patients had similar risks of dying in the next year compared with those who were previously eligible. However, newly eligible and ineligible patients had lower 90-day and one-year hospital readmissions compared with those previously eligible.

Jacob P. Kelly, M.D.; Duke University, Internal Medicine, Durham, North Carolina;

Note: Actual presentation is 6:30 p.m. ET Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015.

Additional Resources:

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