WEDNESDAY NEWS TIPS

February 12, 2014 Categories: Scientific Conferences & Meetings, Stroke News

Tip Titles:

  • tPA may improve quality of life; save healthcare dollars in treating mild stroke
  • ADHD drugs not linked to increased stroke risk among children

NOTE ALL TIMES ARE PACIFIC (PT). ALL TIPS ARE EMBARGOED UNTIL THE TIME OF PRESENTATION OR 3 P.M. PT/6 P.M. ET EACH DAY, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. For more information Feb. 11-14, call the ASA News Media Staff Office at the San Diego Convention Center: (619) 525-6204. Before or after these dates, call the Communications Office in Dallas at (214) 706-1173. For public inquiries, call (800) AHA-USA1 (242-8721).

 

11 a.m. PT – Abstract 136 (Room Ballroom 20D)

tPA may improve quality of life; save healthcare dollars in treating mild stroke

The clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may reduce disability, lead to longer life-expectancy, and save healthcare dollars when administered to people who experience a mild stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014.

tPA has been shown to reduce disability among people with severe ischemic stroke, but there has been little research on its use in mild stroke.

Researchers did mathematical simulations based on published research and information from scientific meetings to estimate the cost-effectiveness comparing two options: one where patients received tPA for mild stroke and another where they do not.

They found:

  • Quality of life for patients is likely greater with tPA. Researchers estimate tPA treatment for mild stroke leads to the equivalent of an average of four months additional unimpaired health.
  • The estimated cost-savings per patient from tPA use was $800-$5,000, because patients were less disabled and needed less long-term care.

Based on the preliminary information, tPA could be very cost-effective in the treatment of mild stroke patients if shown to be effective in clinical studies, researchers said.

Note: Actual presentation is 9:04 a.m. PT Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014.

 

3 p.m. PT – Abstract WMP110 (Room Hall G)

ADHD drugs not linked to increased stroke risk among children

Children who take medication to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) don’t appear to be at increased stroke risk, according to a study presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014.

In a study of 2.5 million 2- to 19-year-olds over a 14-year period, researchers compared stimulant medication usage in children diagnosed with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke to stimulant usage in children without stroke.

Researchers found no association between stroke risk and the use of ADHD stimulant medications at the time of stroke or at any time prior to stroke.

Note: Actual presentation is 5:20 p.m. PT Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014.

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Stroke Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position.  The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events.  The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content.  Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

 


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