Wednesday News Tips

April 29, 2015 Categories: Scientific Conferences & Meetings

Tip headlines:

  • Tele-monitoring boosts patient satisfaction among low-income African Americans with heart failure

  • Hispanic women tend to have lower heart disease risk, healthier attitudes than Caucasian counterparts

Please note specific embargo times for each tip listed below.  All times ET.

UPDATED EMBARGO Embargoed for 5 p.m. ET, Wednesday, April 29, 2015 – Abstract 215

Tele-monitoring boosts patient satisfaction among low-income African Americans with heart failure

Low-income African American heart failure patients who used an at-home monitoring system found it easy to use and many said it improved their medication compliance, according to a small study from the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2015 Scientific Session being published in the AHA Journal, Circulation, Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Researchers reported on the experiences of 12 low-income African American patients with heart failure, who used an at-home tele-monitoring system as a reminder to take their medications and transmit vital signs information to a nurse. The monitoring system included a computer tablet monitor, blood pressure machine, weight scale and pulse oximeter. 

Researchers asked patients what they thought of the tele-monitoring approach after 28 days.

  • All patients said they’d like to continue to use the monitoring system.

  • All found the system very easy or easy to use.

  • All but one patient said the monitoring improved their medication compliance.

  • Eight patients said they felt more involved with their heart failure management; four said it made no difference or they didn’t have a response.

Tele-monitoring seems useful in this patient population and future research should look at whether the approach is cost-effective and actually improves patients’ heart health, researchers said.

Verizon Wireless and BL Health Care funded this study.

Gautam V. Shah, M.D., Resident, Department of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

UPDATED EMBARGO Embargoed for 5 p.m. ET, Wednesday, April 29, 2015 – Abstract 350

Hispanic women tend to have lower heart disease risk, healthier attitudes than Caucasian counterparts

In the United States, Hispanic women have an average life expectancy of 87 years — six years longer than Caucasian women. Part of the reason could be that Hispanic women may have better cardiovascular health accompanied by more positive attitudes about life, according to a study from the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2015 Scientific Session being published in the AHA Journal, Circulation, Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Researchers studied annual health fair and health risk information for 7,683 female employees (4,235 of whom were Hispanic) at a U.S. health system. The researchers looked at 21 cardiovascular health-related characteristics, including biological measures, such as blood pressure, as well as women’s knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors and health attitudes.

They found:

  • Hispanic women had notably better results in 10 of 12 biological measures, including existing heart disease conditions and risks factors, than non-Hispanic women.

  • While there was no difference among Hispanic and non-Hispanic women in their knowledge of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, Hispanic women worried less and overall had more positive attitudes about their health and life.

Although Hispanic women were significantly less inclined to want to increase their time of exercise, they were also less likely to worry about their weight, attitudes that may bode well for them, researchers said.

Baptist Health South Florida funded this research as part its program to improve employee wellness.

Emir Veledar, Ph.D., biostatistician, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Fla.

Additional Resources:

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