Wednesday News Tips

March 02, 2016 Categories: Scientific Conferences & Meetings

Tip Headlines:

  • Inactivity, especially on weekends can impact body composition
  • Daily chocolate consumption linked to better insulin levels in affluent adults
  • Social isolation isn’t good for heart failure patients’ physical, emotional health
  • Post-menopausal women should be physically active and limit sitting time to help prevent death after heart attack

Note: All news materials are embargoed until the time of presentation or 3 p.m. MT/5 p.m. ET each day, whichever comes first.

Embargoed for 3 p.m. MT/ 5 p.m. ET, Wednesday, March 2, 2016 -- Abstract 475

Inactivity, especially on weekends can impact body composition

Inactivity seems to influence young adults’ body compositions — especially, when they are sedentary on weekends, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers reported on a study of 332 adults between ages 20 and 35 years for one year. Time spent sedentary was determined using a device that measured inactivity over a 10 day period. Meanwhile, participants themselves reported sedentary behaviors such as time spent sitting, watching TV, and time spent on a computer separately for weekdays and the weekend.

Researchers found that a change in the time spent being sedentary on the weekend was associated with body composition (total measure of fat, bone, water and muscle) and body fat – a 20 min/day reduction in total sedentary time was associated with a reduction of 1 kg (about 2.2 pounds) body weight and 1.6 percent body fat at 1-year follow-up. However, no association was observed at 12 months.

Change in total sedentary time rather than specific sedentary behaviors were associated with change in body composition. Despite being shorter, weekend behavior has strong indications for weight management.

Clemens Drenawatz, Ph.D., M.Ed., M.S., Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Note: Actual presentation is 5 p.m. MT/7 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2016.

 

Embargo: 3 p.m. MT/ 5 p.m. ET, Wednesday, March 2, 2016 -- Abstract 331

Daily chocolate consumption may be linked to better insulin levels in adults

Eating chocolate on a daily basis may improve insulin levels and liver enzymes in adults, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers studied 1,153 adults, ages 18 to 69 years between 2007 and 2009. Of all the participants, 81.8 percent were classified as chocolate consumers.

They found that consuming 100 mg of chocolate daily was associated with lower levels of insulin resistance, serum insulin and liver enzymes, markers associated with heart disease risk. 

Chocolate consumers were more likely to be younger, physically active, affluent people, who had higher education levels and fewer chronic health issues.

Ala'a Alkerwi, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Researcher, Luxembourg Institute of Health, Luxembourg.

 

Embargo: 3 p.m. MT/ 5 p.m. ET, Wednesday, March 2, 2016 -- Abstract 541

Social isolation isn’t good for heart failure patients’ physical, emotional health

Heart failure patients who are socially isolated tend to have worse functional and mental health than their socially-connected counterparts, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

Researchers surveyed 645 people in Southeast Minnesota who had been diagnosed with heart failure.

They found:

  • People who were not socially isolated reported better scores in physical function, sleep and social activities, had less anxiety, depression, fatigue and pain and better overall health than those reporting moderate and high levels of social isolation.

  • In all but one area — sleep — heart failure patients who reported high social isolation fared worse than those with moderate social isolation.

Addressing social isolation might help to better manage heart failure patients, according to the authors.

Veronique L. Roger, M.D., Professor of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Note: Actual presentation is 5 p.m. MT/7 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2016.

 

Embargo: 3 p.m. MT/ 5 p.m. ET, Wednesday, March 2, 2016 -- Abstract 381

Post-menopausal women should be physically active and limit sitting time to help prevent death after heart attack

Post-menopausal women are less likely to die after suffering a first heart attack if they remain physically active and limit sitting time, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.  

Researchers analyzed physical activity changes using metabolic equivalents (METs) in 838 postmenopausal women, with no history of coronary heart disease, who had their first heart attacks during the study.

METs are a measure of energy expenditure of various activities. 7.5 MET-hrs/week is equivalent to 150 minutes/week of moderate physical activity which is the current recommendation from the American Heart Association and other agencies. Change in sitting time was also investigated in 514 women, prior to and after their first heart attacks at baseline, years three, and six.

They found, compared to women in the inactive group (less than 7.5 MET-hrs/week), the risk of dying from all causes during the study was:

  • Reduced by 57 percent for women who had been inactive before their heart attack but increased their activity to afterwards (7.5 MET-hrs/wk or more).

  • Reduced by 46 percent for women who were active before and remained active after their heart attack (maintaining 7.5 MET-hrs/wk).

They also found a 1 hour/day increase in sitting time after a heart attack was associated with a 9 percent increased the risk of dying from all causes.

Anna Gorczyca M.S., Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.

Note: Actual presentation is 4 p.m. MT/6 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2016.

Additional Resources:

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

For media inquiries about this news release and AHA spokesperson perspective:

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