Search News Releases for Heart News


1 2 360
Showing 110 of 591 Items
  • Aspirin may reduce the risks of reoccurring blood clots

    August 25, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Aspirin is a promising alternative for those who can’t continue on anticoagulant drugs over a long period to prevent blood clots from reoccurring. Aspirin reduced the risk of recurring blood clots by up to 42 percent.

  • Exercise may protect older women from irregular heartbeat

    August 20, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Both normal weight and obese older women can reduce their risk of developing a life-threatening irregular heartbeat by doing more physical activity. Despite earlier research suggestions, strenuous physical activity doesn’t raise the risk of atrial fibrillation in older women.

  • Hospitalizations, deaths from heart disease, stroke drop in last decade

    August 18, 2014 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Study Highlights: U.S. hospitalization and death rates for heart disease and stroke dropped significantly in the last decade. Rates declined more for these conditions than for any others. Improved lifestyle, quality of care and prevention strategies contributed to the decrease.

  • Blacks, women face greater burden from CVD risk factors

    August 11, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: The impact of major cardiovascular risk factors combined is greater in women than men and in blacks than whites. Diabetes and high blood pressure may play the greatest role in leading to cardiovascular disease in women and blacks.

  • Time of arrival at hospital impacts time to treatment and survival of heart attack patients

    July 29, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Study shows heart attack patients who arrive at the hospital during weeknights, weekends and holidays have a 13 percent increased risk of dying compared with those arriving during regular business hours. On average, time to receive angioplasty was 16 minutes faster for people who arrived during business hours. Time of day was not associated with delays in aspirin administration, imaging tests or intravenous clot-busting medications. Compared to previous reports, the researchers observed lower in-hospital deaths and improved door-to-needle times.

  • Eating probiotics regularly may improve your blood pressure

    July 21, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Probiotics – a bacteria in yogurt and supplements – appear to modestly lower blood pressure, according to a review of nine studies. The blood pressure-lowering effect from probiotics was greatest among people with elevated blood pressure. Additional studies are needed before doctors can confidently recommend probiotics for high blood pressure control and prevention.

  • Sexual abuse in childhood linked to signs of atherosclerosis in midlife

    July 17, 2014 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Study Highlights: Women sexually abused in childhood may show signs of atherosclerosis, an early marker of cardiovascular disease in midlife. Psychosocial factors are important to the development of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Awareness of the long-term mental and physical consequences of sexual abuse in childhood needs to be heightened nationally.

  • Home blood pressure-monitoring kits save insurance companies money

    July 14, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Insurance companies can save money by paying for home blood pressure-monitoring kits, which can improve healthcare quality and reduce healthcare costs. Home monitoring kits can be very effective in diagnosing high blood pressure and should become a mainstay of diagnosis and treatment in the United States.

  • Hispanic Americans need culturally tailored heart care

    July 14, 2014 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Statement Highlights: Healthcare providers need to consider culture and ethnicity as they counsel Hispanic patients on health behavior and health outcomes. Because Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing ethnic population in the United States, new research and clinical efforts should be directed towards understanding their range of diverse racial and cultural profiles. Addressing the cardiovascular health of U.S. minority populations, such as Hispanics, will help improve the cardiovascular health of the country as a whole.

  • Young Hispanics often obese, at higher risk for heart diseases

    July 09, 2014 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Obesity is common among U.S. Hispanics and is severe among young Hispanics. This is associated with a considerable risk for heart diseases.

1 2 360
Showing 110 of 591 Items