Search News Releases for Heart News


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  • Midlife fitness is linked to lower stroke risks later in life

    June 09, 2016 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Being more physically fit in your mid- to late-40s was associated with lower stroke risks after age 65, independent of traditional stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation. Researchers...

  • Insufficient sleep cycle – especially for shift workers – may increase heart disease risk

    June 06, 2016 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Insufficient sleep and sleep-cycle disruption can impair the body’s rhythms and cardiovascular function, and may explain increased cardiovascular risks observed in shift workers. A new study suggests the hearts of people working non-traditional hours may not be rejuvenated by sleep because their sleep cycle is routinely disrupted. Since shift work often can’t be avoided, researchers suggest counteracting measures such as a healthy diet, regular exercise and more sleep, be encouraged among shift-workers.

  • Prevention is key to closing racial disparity gap in stroke

    June 02, 2016 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Study Highlights: Middle aged African-Americans are more likely to die of stroke than are whites, not because of differences in care after stroke, but because blacks are having more strokes. Researchers suggest greater prevention efforts aimed at younger African-Americans are needed to raise awareness of early stroke risk and contributing factors.

  • Post coronary artery bypass infections may be linked to severe obesity

    June 01, 2016 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Coronary artery bypass patients with severe obesity had triple the odds of infection soon after surgery compared to patients with normal weight. Risk of overall complications was higher for patients with moderate to severe obesity.

  • High blood pressure linked to short-, long-term exposure to some air pollutants

    May 31, 2016 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: High blood pressure was associated with short-term and long-term exposure to some air pollutants commonly associated with the burning / combustion of fossil fuels, dust and dirt. Researchers suggest people – especially those with high blood pressure – limit their time outdoors when pollution levels are high.

  • Smoking may increase kidney disease risk in African-Americans

    May 25, 2016 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans. The more cigarettes smoked daily, the higher the risk of kidney failure over time. Increased inflammation in current smokers points to a possible link.

  • Nearly half of all heart attacks may be ‘silent’

    May 16, 2016 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights Nearly half of all heart attacks may be silent — occurring without any symptoms. Like heart attacks with symptoms, silent heart attacks increase the risk of death. Because people do not realize they had a silent heart attack, they...

  • Around-the-clock monitoring may unmask hypertension in African-Americans

    May 16, 2016 Categories: Heart News

    Study Highlights: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, a device which measures blood pressure around-the-clock may help identify African Americans who have “masked” or undetected high blood pressure. African Americans with any masked hypertension had twice the risk of developing clinic hypertension when compared to those who had both normal clinic and normal out-of-office blood pressure.

  • Stroke in younger Danish adults spiked over the past two decades

    May 11, 2016 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Study Highlights Stroke and “warning stroke” in young adults may be on the rise in Denmark. Hospital admissions for first-time stroke and TIA increased in people 15 to 30 years of age from 1994 to 2012 in Denmark. Researchers say an increase in the number of people with diabetes and obesity may have contributed to this trend, which may make the results applicable to the United States.

  • U.S. stroke hospitalizations drop overall, but increase for young people and African-Americans

    May 11, 2016 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

    Study Highlights Nationwide, hospitalizations for strokes fell almost 20 percent between 2000 and 2010. However, there is a sharp increase in hospitalizations among those age 25 to 44. Prevention efforts that address risk factors, such as high blood pressure, may be contributing to the findings for older Americans.

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