Did you know?

Each year, over 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. Statistics prove that if more people knew CPR, more lives could be saved.

Do you know the difference between a heart attack and cardiac arrest?

The term "heart attack" is often mistakenly used to describe cardiac arrest. While a heart attack may cause cardiac arrest and sudden death, the terms don't mean the same thing. Heart attacks are caused by a blockage that stops blood flow to the heart. A heart attack (or myocardial infarction) refers to death of heart muscle tissue due to the loss of blood supply, not necessarily resulting in the death of the heart attack victim.



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Hands-Only CPR, which involves only chest compressions, has emerged in recent years as an alternative to standard CPR, which involves both chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths.

The AHA included Hands-Only CPR in its 2015 guidelines to allow bystanders who don't know how to give rescue breaths – or are uncomfortable doing it – the option to provide only chest compressions until medical help arrives.

Did you know?

The American Heart Association's CPR & ECC inspires the world to save lives and envisions a world where no one dies from cardiac arrest. The AHA is the leader in resuscitation science, education, and training, and publisher of the official Guidelines for CPR and ECC. Millions of healthcare providers and others trust the AHA for their lifesaving training, and 100% of the AHA's profits go back into supporting its lifesaving mission.




The new pandemic threat: People may die because they’re not calling 911


If you or a loved one experiences heart attack or stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. It's your best chance of surviving or saving a life.


Dr. Comilla Sasson, M.D., Ph.D., FAHA, FACEP is the American Heart Association VP of Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science and Innovation and an Associate Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado, Denver where she is a practicing ER physician. In April, she joined others on the front lines in New York City fighting COVID-19. Hear her advice on calling 9-1-1 during the pandemic.


Get active how you can this summer!

Are you fitting in at least 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of heart-pumping physical activity per week? If not, you’re not alone. Only about one in five adults and teens get enough exercise to maintain good health.

Help yourself and your kids say safe, active, and healthy as temperatures rise.


More summer health tips for all families:

1. Identify free times for activity.

Keep track of each family member’s daily activities for one week. You’ll get a snapshot of when you might be able to get the family together for physical activity. It can also help you see which activities you can cut back on.

Pick two 30-minute and two 60-minute time slots for family activity time. Weekdays are usually better for 30-minute activities and weekends are better for 60-minute activities. Try to spread out the time slots. Here are some ideas to get your kids moving that parents can join in.

2. Plan a weekly menu and prep your meals.

Keep track of how many times you grab food on the go for one week. Once you find blocks of time when you can do a little planning, it’ll be easier to learn healthy preparation methods and fix healthy snacks while also using shelf-stable foods.

3. Simplify your family’s schedule.

In today’s society we’re expected to do it all. But this type of non-stop lifestyle isn’t sustainable or healthy. Try prioritizing your activities and see what you can do without so you’ll have more time for the things that matter. You can also work on ways to manage stress.

4. Take baby steps, not giant leaps.

If you’re the head of your household, making sure that all the heads and hearts in your home are healthy is a lot to handle. The key is to take baby steps. Getting healthy is a journey; you don’t have to do everything at once.

5. Ask everyone in the family to do their part.

Depending on their ages, kids can help prepare healthy meals and help around the house. Treat your family like a team and encourage everyone to work together.

6. Live by example.

We all need to do our best to walk the walk. If we want our kids to eat healthy and exercise, we’ve got to model that behavior. You’re not perfect, but if you’re determined and persistent, there’s not much that can stop you.


Why learn Hands-Only CPR?

Cardiac arrest – an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs – is a leading cause of death. Each year, more than 350,000 EMS-assessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. When a person has a cardiac arrest, survival depends on immediately receiving CPR from someone nearby. According to the American Heart Association, about 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. CPR, especially if performed immediately, can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim’s chance of survival.



Important Dates in June

6/1-6/7- CPR Week

6/7- National Cancer Survivors Day

6/14- Flag Day, World Blood Donor Day

6/21- Father's Day

6/15-6/21- Men's Health Week

6/19- World Sickle Cell Day

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