Amgen CEO demonstrates commitment to workplace health as new member of the American Heart Association CEO Roundtable

CEO members have collectively pledged to improve the health of our nation’s companies, their employees, and communities

December 01, 2017 Categories: Program News

DALLAS, December 1, 2017 — The American Heart Association—the world’s leading voluntary organization dedicated to building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke—proudly welcomes Amgen Chairman and CEO, Robert A. Bradway, as the newest member of its CEO Roundtable. The CEO Roundtable is the Association’s leadership collaborative with over 35-member CEOs who represent some of the nation’s largest employers committed to applying evidence-based approaches to improve their employees’ overall health and the health of their communities. 

The American Heart Association is committed to equitable health and well-being for all, for patients and health consumers everywhere, regardless of where they live. The AHA CEO Roundtable collaborative is uniquely positioned to influence and transform the communities where employees live and work.

 “Our CEO members have a shared commitment to integrate health and well-being into the overall fabric of their workplaces and into their communities,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association. “We’re delighted to have Bob join us on our journey to build a culture of health and well-being, especially for patients facing life-interrupting illnesses.”

CEO Roundtable members are pioneering new and innovative ways to help meet the Association’s goal of improving the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent by 2020 with simple behavior changes that produce significant results.

“I’m honored to join the AHA’s CEO Roundtable to share our experiences and learn from others how best to promote a culture of heart health in America’s workplaces and beyond,” said Robert A. Bradway, chairman and chief executive officer at Amgen.

Amgen is demonstrating its commitment to fighting cardiovascular disease in a variety of ways.  The company invests approximately $4 billion annually in research and development, pursuing new medicines to treat serious illnesses, including cardiovascular disease.  Amgen’s cardiovascular portfolio includes several approved and investigational medicines that address important unmet patient needs, such as high cholesterol and heart failure. 

Amgen employees have access to a comprehensive wellness program that emphasizes the importance of taking control of your heart health.  Aspects of the program include wellness walks, nutrition education, cholesterol screenings, and blood pressure checks.

Within the community, Amgen partners with the AHA on Breakaway from Heart Disease™, a program dedicated to empowering everyone to take action for good heart health.  The program offers diagnostic screenings at the Amgen Tour of California, one of the country’s premier cycling events, in addition to providing information related to increased physical activity and healthy eating. 

Cardiovascular diseases impact the multinational workforce as the world’s most urgent health threat in terms of mortality, suffering and economic burden. More than 17.5 million people die from cardiovascular disease every year, making it the leading cause of death and disability in the world today. By 2030, this figure is expected to reach approximately 23 million, with estimated global cost more than a trillion dollars by 20301.

Fueled by the science and mission of the Association, member CEOs take bold action to help create scalable solutions that have the broadest health impact on people across the country, drive innovations in employee health through evidence-based interventions, and engage and improve the lives of their more than nine million employees and family members. For more information visit www.heart.org/workplacehealth.

1American Heart Association Heart and Stroke Statistics at a Glance, 2017

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About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – two of the leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is one of the world’s oldest and largest voluntary organizations dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, visit www.heart.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Media Contact:

Jennifer Pratt, American Heart Association, Jennifer.Pratt@heart.org; 214.706.2229