Reports: Mick Jagger recovering after undergoing TAVR to repair heart valve issue

April 04, 2019 Categories: Media Alerts, Heart News

DALLAS, April 4, 2019 — Global media reports say Rolling Stones frontman, Mick Jagger, is recovering after undergoing a heart valve procedure called TAVR at a New York Hospital.

The American Heart Association website defines TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) as a minimally invasive surgical procedure that repairs the valve without removing the old, damaged valve. Instead, it wedges a replacement valve into the aortic valve's place. The surgery may be called a TAVR or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

Here's how it works, somewhat similar to a stent placed in an artery, the TAVR approach delivers a fully collapsible replacement valve to the valve site through a catheter. Once the new valve is expanded, it pushes the old valve leaflets out of the way and the tissue in the replacement valve takes over the job of regulating blood flow.

This procedure is fairly new and is FDA approved for people with symptomatic aortic stenosis who are considered an intermediate or high risk patient for standard valve replacement surgery. The differences in the two procedures are significant.

Usually valve replacement requires an open heart procedure with a “sternotomy,” in which the chest is surgically separated (opened) for the procedure. The TAVR or TAVI procedures can be done through very small openings that leave all the chest bones in place.

A TAVR procedure is not without risks, but it provides beneficial treatment options to people who may not have been candidates for them a few years ago while also providing the added bonus of a faster recovery in most cases. A patient's experience with a TAVR procedure may be comparable to a balloon treatment or even an angiogram in terms of down time and recovery, and will likely require a shorter hospital stay (average 3-5 days).

The TAVR procedure is performed using one of two different approaches, allowing the cardiologist or surgeon to choose which one provides the best and safest way to access the valve:

  • Entering through the femoral artery (large artery in the groin), called the transfemoral approach, which does not require a surgical incision in the chest, or
  • Using a minimally invasive surgical approach with a small incision in the chest and entering through a large artery in the chest or through the tip of the left ventricle (the apex), which is known as the transapical approach.

At this time the procedure is reserved for those people for whom an open heart procedure poses intermediate risk. For that reason, most people who have this procedure are in their 70s or 80 and often have other medical conditions that make them a better candidate for this type of surgery.

"TAVR has truly transformed the care of patients with aortic stenosis who require aortic valve replacement, who can now have successful valve replacement without need for open heart surgery. This procedure achieves excellent results equivalent to those of surgery, but with low risk and shorter recovery times," says Robert O. Bonow, MD, MS American Heart Association past president, Professor of Cardiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.

 Visit risks for valve disease to see what makes a person at increased risk for developing a dangerous heart valve problem. The American Heart Association also has a patient guide: Understanding Your Heart Valve Problem (PDF)

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About the American Heart Association

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